TRG presentations
TRG presentations
Jun16

You’ve got a CRM system. You’ve got reports galore. But how can you use data to affect change at your theatre? DataArts has partnered with field experts to create a new series of free online courses teaching essential data skills for arts leaders. In this session, TRG Arts will present a brief preview from Connecting the Dots: Audience Data Essentials, a course they co-created with DataArts. Attendees will leave the session with 4 basic metrics to track at their own theatre, plus ideas about how these courses can serve as a valuable resource for their own learning, or as a professional development tool for their staff. 

Posted June 16, 2017







Jun16

One of the biggest challenges for theatre leaders lies in perfecting the balance between commercially popular and artistically ambitious plays. In 2014, Kansas City Repertory Theatre was at a crossroads with programming choices, finding it difficult to grow new audiences and cultivate their current loyal supporters. The artistic and executive director decided to do something quite radical: quantify the impact of programming on audience development. Some of the questions they asked were: Which genres grow new audiences? Which deepen current loyalty? Which plays encourage and discourage repeat attendance? Does venue impact audience behavior? How are factors like per-ticket spend impacted?  Learn what the data said about different artistic genres and the types of audiences it attracted, how KC Rep used the data as inspiration for their new Creative Future Fund, and the results they’ve seen in the following three years in audience and revenue numbers.


Posted June 16, 2017







May17

Walk through identifying marketing, attendance, virtual participation, expenses, and earned revenue strategies and challenges, as well as examples of data-guided, sustainable change. You will discover how performance metrics impact everyday decision-making, assess which areas may require new cross-departmental strategic thinking, and determine data-guided, sustainable ideas for attracting funding and audiences.

In this session, presented in 2017 at The American Alliance of Museums Annual Meeting, Jill Robinson and Zannie Voss (National Center for Arts Research) discuss ways to measure and improve organizational health.


Posted May 17, 2017







Mar22

David Brownlee of TRG Arts at the 2017 UK Theatre Touring SymposiumTRG's David Brownlee presents new data on touring productions at the UK Theatre Touring Symposium on March 23, 2017. David's research illuminates trends in ticket income from touring and non-touring productions over several years. 

One major takeaway of the study was that touring productions account for the majority of tickets sold and income across UK Theatre venues. The overall figure is driven by the performance of musicals at the largest venues, but the majority of revenues for plays in the UK now also come from touring productions.


Posted March 22, 2017







Jun23

Seven theatres. 10 seasons of data. One community. Learn what this study reveals about theatre patrons in one community and their buying and giving habits. The importance of audience development and retention shines through, in light of data analysis on how Washington, D.C. theatres are attracting and holding on to patrons. Zoom in on trends in patronage in this community, including new theatre-goers and patrons who attend multiple theatres. Learn about the clusters of patrons in this community who look demographically or transactionally similar. Unlock the secrets of audience behavior that may point to trends in your own community.

This presentation was given at the 2016 Theatre Communication Group Conference in Washington, D.C. by TRG's President & CEO Jill Robinson and leaders from Shakespeare Theatre Company and Arena Stage.

This session presents: 

  • The benefits of a community wide market research campaign
  • The actions this community is taking as a result of the research findings
  • The role of audience development initiatives in strengthening loyalty and attendance patterns

Posted June 23, 2016







Jun21

Jill Robinson at the 2016 League of American Orchestras conferenceA patron’s loyalty is built step-by-step with each interaction with your organization. Each purchase and each donation is an indicator of the affinity that patrons feel for the organization. The problem in the evolution of patrons often occurs in the hand-off between marketing and development.

In this session, presented in 2016 at the League of American Orchestras Conference, Jill Robinson and Lindsay Anderson discussed patron segmentation strategies and proven practices for closing the gap between subscribers and donors.


Posted June 21, 2016







Feb02


Anita Hansen
Senior Consultant

From Service to Entrepreneurialism


With online transactions now accounting for the majority of ticket purchases, what’s the role of the traditional box office? The people who interact with patrons at your organization still have an enormous role to play in providing customer service, generating revenue, and increasing loyalty. Are you setting them up for success? This short presentation discussed making an upgrade plan, incentivizing staff to implement it, and measuring your success. In this session, learn strategies to turn your box office into an entrepreneurial, revenue-generating operation within your organization. This presentation was given by Senior Consultant Anita Hansen at the 2016 InTix Conference in Anaheim, California.

Posted February 2, 2016







Jan11


Lindsay Anderson
VP of Client Development
Think audience development is marketing’s job? Think again. All departments play a critical role in retaining and cultivating patron relationships. In order to make a patron-centered business model work, all departments—including ticketing and patron services, artistic staff, development, and executive leaders—must align their objectives with that of patron loyalty. 

In this session, presented at the 2016 Chamber Music America conference in New York City, both executives and staff members will reexamine how they lead and collaborate on initiatives that create lasting patron relationships. TRG's VP of Client Development Lindsay Anderson looked at how cross-departmental campaigns build loyalty, how a sales orientation in the patron services department can bolster marketing-development collaboration, and how artistic programming can also factor into loyalty-building.

Posted January 11, 2016







Jan08


Lindsay Anderson
VP of Client Development
What motivates someone to attend a concert? And, more, importantly, what drives them to attend again and again? Arts managers (and patrons themselves) often cite price as the main and biggest incentive for arts attendance. Certainly price plays a major role in a customer’s decision-making process. 

But pricing doesn’t mean anything unless it’s attached to value. It’s a two-sided equation, with price on one side and demand—how much a patron wants the experience—on the other.

Luckily, you have tools that can sweeten the value proposition for your audiences. Ticketing inventory, historical data, discounting, and the choice and timing of programming can help you incentivize audiences to engage with you again and again.


Posted January 8, 2016







Nov09

Maximizing Relevancy in the Age of Personalization

Today’s patrons expect arts organizations to take their personal context into account when we communicate with them.  Whether we’re engaging new audiences, stimulating revenue growth, or deepening relationships with existing patrons – context is key.  Contextual marketing requires us to understand more than who a patron is but where they are, what they’re doing, and what are they likely to do next.  Contextual marketing is something arts marketers have always done, but recent shifts in technology and marketing practices allow our efforts to be more personalized, more relevant, and more effective than ever before. 

In this workshop, David Dombrosky of InstantEncore, Ronia Holmes of Hubbard Street, and Amelia Northrup-Simpson of TRG Arts explored the elements of contextual marketing through a series of exercises focused on leveraging patrons’ context to maximize relevance and effectiveness.


Posted November 9, 2015







Nov03

Putting your patrons at the center grows your revenues beyond what marketing or development could do alone. In this session presented at the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation's Art of Change Workshop, participants learned the tangible benefits of casting off a siloed business model in favor of one that treats your patrons holistically, from their ticket-buying to their philanthropy. TRG's Vice President of Client Service Keri Mesropov examined how leading toward an integrated organization requires strong change management skills, but the payoff can be big loyalty gains. How can executives (and aspiring executives) break down the traditional silos between artistic, marketing and development to put your patrons at the center of revenue growth?


Posted November 3, 2015







Oct30

Desarrollar audiencias a partir de los datos

As public subsidies for the arts change, organizations must rely on people—their audiences and patrons—to provide the revenue to sustain them long-term. How can organizations build a new business model that both serves audiences and relies on them for revenue? The first step is to see what the data says about building these patron relationships.

In this keynote, presented at the 2015 Conferencia de Marketing de las Artes in Madrid and Barcelona, Jill Robinson of the arts consulting firm TRG Arts offered data-inspired lessons on how organizations can monetize patron relationships. These relationships drive the revenue that allows the entire organization to thrive, instead of merely surviving. Jill also discussed data collection and privacy concerns, and how to create incentives for genuine connection between patrons and organization.


Posted October 30, 2015







Jun18

Humana Festival audienceMany organizations track data on pricing, audience retention, and audience response to different types of artistic programming. But what happens when an organization looks at these categories together, holistically? That’s what Actors Theatre of Louisville did. What they found led them to begin to manage demand, cultivate audiences, and approach the strategic planning process in a completely new ways.

This is a story about how data can re-focus an organization around audiences, and how Actors Theatre of Louisville is acting on that data. Managing Director Jennifer Bielstein and ‎Jim DeGood of TRG Arts gave this presentation at the 2015 Theatre Communications Group, detailing how Actors Theatre of Louisville has translated data findings into a plan, how leadership is re-aligning around data and audience loyalty, and some initial results from their efforts.


Posted June 18, 2015







May08

"Loyalty takes time." That was the key point that Jill Robinson, President & CEO of TRG Arts, put forth in a discussion of young donors at the 2015 Opera America Conference in Washington, DC. The panel's premise was that, with opera audiences growing older, companies must focus their attention on new generations of support. While development departments may have mastered the appeal to traditionalists and baby boomers, Gen Xers and millennials are looking for something else. Attendees at this standing-room only session learned what the data says about these patrons, what matters to next gen donors, and how opera companies can engage them. 


Posted May 8, 2015







May05


Hubbard Street Dance Chicago in
One Thousand Pieces by
 Resident Choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo.
Photo by Todd Rosenberg.
Categorizing arts patrons simply as ticket buyers, subscribers, or donors can hide the total value of the investments they make with an arts organization. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago tracked patterns of patron investment holistically, across those categories. What they found led them to cultivate audiences in a completely new ways.

Chief Marketing and Development Officer Bill Melamed of Hubbard Street and ‎Amelia Northrup-Simpson of TRG Arts presented this session at the 2015 Do Good Data Conference, detailing how audiences are engaging differently with Hubbard Street nearly two years later. This is a story about the important role data plays in centering an organization around patron loyalty, and how Hubbard Street acted on that data. 

Posted May 5, 2015







Apr24

Photo by Sheila Sund (CC BY 2.0)
Do you thrive on structure and planning? Or relish the more spontaneous aspects of your work? These opposing principles were the focus of a session entitled "Chaos, Order, and Innovation" at the 2015 Colorado Creative Industries Summit in Fort Collins, CO. Being a successful arts entrepreneur means balancing a dedication to strategic planning with a matched excitement for improvising and deviating from traditional structure.  Amelia Northrup-Simpson of TRG Arts and Laura Kakolewski of Americans for the Arts led a workshop session exploring what it means to live with some ratio of order-to-chaos in our work, how we react to complexity and ambiguity, and how improvisation and iteration can lead to innovation.


Posted April 24, 2015







Apr01


Photo by Hsing Wei (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Data isn’t about numbers. It’s about people. When analyzed, data tells stories about people and their actions. Right now, in your database, a story exists about the decisions that people in your organization make. And, a story exists for every patron, which chronicles their relationship with your organization.

Having all those stories recorded in your database means that you don’t have to guess at what patrons are doing, or the impact that your decisions have made. TRG started as a consulting firm committed to building sustainable patron revenue for arts and cultural institutions. In order to get results for our clients, we found that we had to stop guessing at the right strategies and start using data to drive our counsel, which was a novel concept back in the ‘90’s.

In order to tell an accurate and truthful story, the data that you have must be complete and clean. At the organizational level, you may find it challenging to collect, manage, and effectively apply transactional data. Within the past twelve months we’ve found ourselves in conversations with the Cultural Data Project, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Center for Arts Research, and a host of other research and CRM vendors who perform data analytics services. In our conversations all parties acknowledged that, while challenges exist, effective data management is both achievable and is rising in organizational value. 


Posted April 1, 2015







Jan14


An illustration of Seattle Repertory Theatre's "One Patron"
strategy, where SRT streamlined patron messaging and built
long term relationships across all points of interaction.

The Art of the Upgrade

For cultural institutions, the box office is not just the place where ticket orders are passively taken. It plays an active role in growing revenue by developing loyalty. Every time a patron logs in, calls, or visits to buy a ticket, the opportunity exists for them to upgrade and deepen their relationship with the organization. With the right training, the box office can become experts on how to cultivate patron relationships and keep audiences coming back for more. 

TRG President & CEO Jill Robinson presented this session at the 2015 InTix conference in Denver with Jeremy Scott of Seattle Repertory Theatre and Molly Riddle Wink of Denver Art Museum. In this session, they discussed:
- How making loyalty a priority can grow revenues
- How to build a loyalty strategy for every group within your existing audience
- How organizations can train box office staff to take on loyalty responsibilities


Posted January 14, 2015







Jan13


The Orpheum Theater at Omaha Performing Arts, 2014.
Photo by Jodi Hauptman Drannen.
Pricing strategies can have great impact on deals and revenue for both agents and presenters. In the middle of this mix is the audience and their behavior that either creates demand for your performances, or leaves you with a lot of empty seats. Jill Robinson of TRG Arts, Jackie Knobbe of APA Agency, Jeremy Ganter of Mondavi Center, UC Davis, and Joan Squires of Omaha Performing Arts discussed the ins and outs of maximizing revenue and developing audiences through pricing and scaling in this session, presented at the 2015 APAP conference in New York City.

Posted January 13, 2015







Nov11

Creating Holistic Campaigns in a Brave New World 


With the rise of Google Analytics, conversion pixels, and referral codes, there are more tools than ever for tracking the results of your organization’s marketing campaigns. Yet even with hard evidence that digital efforts produce results, is it really time to shut the door on established methods such as direct mail, print/display advertising, and grassroots marketing? Can leaning too far in either direction impair one’s ability to capture a “middle ground”? 

This session, presented at the 2014 National Arts Marketing Project Conference, examined case studies of campaigns that successfully integrated old and new school marketing and campaign measurement via an integrated, “holistic” approach. The panelists tackled questions such as: how do specific demographics and audiences respond to different types of messaging? What is the value of “eyes-only” impressions vs. conversions that result in hard-and fast (and trackable) revenue? 

Presenters: Eric Winick of JCC Manhattan, Amelia Northrup-Simpson of TRG Arts, Molly Riddle Wink of Denver Art Museum, Khady Kamara of Arena Stage

Posted November 11, 2014







Oct24


Senior Consultant
Anita Hansen
Today's database, ticketing, and CRM systems can tell administrators nearly everything they could possibly want to know about patrons. More data isn't necessarily helpful, though. Studying everything can distract administrators from the metrics on which they need to focus to grow audiences and revenue. 


In this 90-minute intensive presented at the 2014 Arts Reach National Arts Marketing, Development & Ticketing Conference, Anita Hansen explained how organizations can stop studying every metric and focus on the most critical indicators of growth and sustainability. You’ll learn how to find TRG's five most actionable Thrive Metrics in your own data, what they say about your organization’s health, and how to act on the data to engage and cultivate patrons.


Posted October 24, 2014







Oct21

Membership for love or moneyVisitors become members for two reasons—because they love the organization and because they are driven by the value of the transaction.

Research of arts consumer behavior shows that those with a true passion for your museum’s mission can be cultivated beyond membership to long-term, high-value patronage. Visitors who view membership as a transaction may be harder to attract and retain, but some could deepen their relationship with the right visitor development strategy.

But how can membership officers put the right strategies in place to attract members and keep them loyal? Learn more in this presentation, which was given at the 2014 American Museum Membership Conference by Molly Wink of Denver Art Museum and Jill Robinson of TRG Arts.


Posted October 21, 2014







Jun19

Love the ones you're with--opportunity lies with existing patronsWhat happens when data analysis shows that some things you’re doing really well are also impeding future success? If you’re the Guthrie Theater looking at TRG’s loyalty and root cause analysis, you galvanize your whole team around keeping patrons and growing their ongoing support. In this workshop, TRG’s President & CEO Jill Robinson shared the metrics and patron behavior findings that alerted Guthrie and informed change. Trish Kirk, Guthrie’s Director of Marketing & Audience Development, described choices, actions, and new practices Guthrie has undertaken. Learn from Guthrie's experience how putting patron loyalty first can help sustain your theater. 

Posted June 19, 2014







Jun05


President & CEO
Jill Robinson

Every organization has critical and very accessible database information that provides indicators of growth and sustainability. Jill Robinson, President and CEO of TRG Arts, presented TRG's most actionable Thrive Metrics at ArtsPride New Jersey's Thrive Conference at Princeton University. This presentation will tell you how to find these data points and what the research says about using data to stimulate engagement and nurture relationships with patrons. 

Want more information about the most important metrics you can study? Read Jill's recent blog post, Data that Matters: 3 Metrics to Grow Audience Relationships.


Posted June 5, 2014







May31


President & CEO
Jill Robinson
President & CEO Jill Robinson presented this intensive session on patron loyalty on May 31, 2014 at the Canadian Arts Marketing, Development & Ticketing Conference in Toronto. Two decades of arts consumer research is clear: patron relationships have the plot lines of a love story. Take, for instance that first contact with a person that has never before walked into your organization’s life. It could be the beginning of long, loyal engagement or a one night stand, depending on how you behave on this first date. In this 90-minute workshop, Jill showed how to build happily-ever-after relationships that can build patron loyalty and revenue. Hear case studies on today’s best loyalty practices and learn techniques that are timely for you to apply in your own organization now. 

Posted May 31, 2014







May20

TRG's VP of Client Services Keri Mesropov, along with Heather Calvin of Boston’s Museum of Science and Jessica Toon of EMP Museum presented a session entitled “What Price is Right?” at the American Alliance of Museums 2014 Annual Meeting & Museum Expo in Seattle, WA.

This session explores how museums can use demand-based pricing strategies to set admission prices, service fees, discounts, and membership levels. Keri, Heather, and Jessica provided practical grounding and new ideas to help museum leadership determine what visitors should pay.


Posted May 20, 2014







Nov14

"Large data sets and big revenue goals can be overwhelming," Amelia Northrup-Simpson said at the 2013 National Arts Marketing Project Conference. "We can simplify those by stepping back and viewing marketing efforts through the 'patron lens'. That means thinking about each patron’s right next step with your organization and talking to your audience like you know them to get them to take that next step."

David Dombrosky of InstantEncore and Amanda Edelman of Academy of Vocal Arts joined Northrup-Simpson to present a session entitled "The Patron Lens: Engaging Audiences with Data-driven Targeted Messaging." In the session, the three presenters discussed topics including putting patron data in context and why to segment communications. The presenters also covered three different ways to segment: by generation, by loyalty level, and by technology usage.


Posted November 14, 2013







Oct27

"Monetizing Audience Engagement, A Love Story" was presented at the 2013 Arts Reach National Arts Marketing, Development, and Ticketing Conference in San Francisco, CA, where TRG Arts’ veteran patron loyalty consultant Keri Mesropov and Director of Network Programs David Seals compared standard ways of relationship-building to the happily-ever-after best practices that are sustaining smart arts organizations. 

Session Description:

Isn’t it funny that we use the term “engagement” to describe audience interaction with our organizations? The word can mean ‘get together”—a meeting or visit. It can also mean commitment as in promise to marry. As that range of definition implies, and two decades of arts consumer research shows, engagement has the plot lines of a love story. 


Posted October 27, 2013







Oct04

"What makes a patron donor ready?" TRG President Jill Robinson asked this question to open her session at the 2013 Blackbaud Conference in Washington, D.C. The answer was not a "what," but a "who"—you do. Arts managers hold in their hands the power to cultivate a patron relationship from ticket buyer to donor... or not.

In her session entitled "The Making of a Donor-Ready Patron", Jill helped conference participants evaluate their own cultivation efforts alongside the happily-ever-after best practices that are sustaining smart arts organizations. In the slides below and Blackbaud's post summarizing the session, you too can learn about the loyalty steps your patrons are taking toward donor-readiness and the initiatives you can take to keep moving patron relationships to the next level. 


Posted October 4, 2013







Sep06

TRG Arts has been busy teaching this summer on the road and on the web. We’ve rounded up our most recent insights from last month below, in case you missed anything:

The Art of the Upgrade

President Jill Robinson gave a webinar hosted by Blackbaud last week about increasing patrons’ investment in and loyalty to arts organizations through upgrading.

“The best way to increase loyalty is to ask the patron to take the right next step with you. That’s what we call upgrading,” Jill said. “That right next step is different for each patron. And the right next step is informed by information in your database.”

The most recent version of this webinar is now available here.

Slides from the presentation:
 

Posted September 6, 2013







Aug15

This presentation was given by Anita Hansen of TRG Arts and Charlie Wade, consultant and former director of marketing, Atlanta Symphony at the 2013 Association of California Symphony Orchestras Conference.

Description: 

Talk about a changing universe! What does the future hold if subscriptions are truly a thing of the past? Current thinking postulates that a long-term decline in audience commitment is inevitable. A meteoric shower of “one-time” promotions and discounts – crowdsourcing, Goldstar, Fill-A-Seat, Living Social – has captivated the general public and given us options for filling our venues. But is this solution sustainable? Let’s assess the situation and determine if belief in accepted prevailing societal trends will lead to an ever-downward spiral to obscurity. Identify the “hidden” and unique performance assets you already possess to cultivate patron loyalty and grow participation. Perhaps there’s a way to re-create a winning game with new awareness of how to play.


Posted August 15, 2013







Jun20

Two decades of arts consumer study has led the consulting firm TRG Arts to conclude that 2013 is the year choral organizations must frame their marketing efforts around The Patron. Knowing who buys your tickets and subscribe and contributes, when and how much is the best way to inform how you package, price, and promote your programs.  The best part: it’s a matter of focus. Every organization can use the information and skills they have to market better.  In this three-hour workshop presented at the 2013 Chorus America conference, Joanne Steller and Amelia Northrup-Simpson shared best marketing practices that are patron-based, time-proven and updated for the digital age. You’ll learn strategic ideas on building lasting loyalty and revenue that can sustain your organization.

Posted June 20, 2013







Jun20

Technology moves fast. It's hard to keep up with all the shiny new apps, devices, social networks and overall technology trends--and still do all the things you need to in order to market your chorus. This session, presented by Amelia Northrup-Simpson at the 2013 Chorus America Conference, focuses on the top technology trends and concerns you may need to act on in the coming year, including big data for arts organizations, mobile technology, and where to focus your social media efforts.

Posted June 20, 2013







May28

Is your organization’s pricing strategy focused only on the cost of admission? Developed in just one department?  This 90-minute workshop, presented at the Arts Reach Canada Conference in May 2013, was designed to show leadership teams how much more there is to consider and to gain. High-impact pricing generates positive perception, improved patron loyalty, and greater revenue for every admission or seat sold.  


Posted May 28, 2013







May23

This session, presented at the 2013 AAM conference in Baltimore, explored an established enterprise model—loyalty through customer relationship management—and reimagine it for our museums. Designed to provoke thought-leadership for museum CEOs, COOs, department heads, as well as across functional areas, this presentation will spotlight practical steps for increasing museum loyalty and reaping the results. Presenters included: Jill Robinson, Suzette Sherman, and Heather Calvin, Associate Vice President, Visitor Services and Membership at Boston's Museum of Science.

Posted May 23, 2013







Nov03

Accelerating Results in the Digital Age 

Find out why direct mail is the more trusted and more effective medium for direct communication with prospective patrons, and how using it in addition to other media fuels campaigns. This presentation was given by Will Lester, Vice President of Community Data Networks, during the Lightning Rounds of Research at the 2012 NAMP Conference.


Posted November 3, 2012







May16

Issues that can profoundly affect revenue growth are a hot topic at this year’s round of arts conferences. TRG Arts will be contributing to the dialog on how an organization strategizes around loyalty and the way pricing maximizes revenue—or not. Watch this blog for further posts on what we present and observe.

The Broadway League Conference, New York, NY: CEO Rick Lester co-moderates a panel May 17 at The Broadway League Conference on dynamic pricing. The decision to implement this now ubiquitous tactic affects every single person within an organization. In this session, Rick and colleagues from organizations that have embraced dynamic pricing compare results and debate the merits.

The League of American Orchestras Conference, Dallas, TX: TRG President Jill Robinson and VP of Client Services Keri Mesropov will be in attendance. Jill will lead a presentation June 7 in conjunction with Chicago Symphony Orchestra for Group 1 and 2 marketing directors on “loyalty mapping”, a technique for leveraging the incredible asset available in performing organizations’ loyalty arsenal…the seat.

Posted May 16, 2012







Mar19

Eight out of ten new customers for the arts never come back after the first visit. How’s an organization supposed to raise donors against those odds? Jill Robinson, President of TRG Arts, applies two decades of arts patron behavior research to illustrate how donors grow with good cultivation and customer service by every member of an organization’s team. Get an expert overview on your organization’s best donor prospects, what you have to do to win them, and how you can keep them moving up (not down) the patronage escalator. Presented here are ideas you can implement whether you are a member of the development, marketing or ticket office team.

Posted March 19, 2012







Mar18

When done right and well, pricing strategies earn revenue and also create and retain lifelong, loyal patrons. This 3-hour intensive at the Spring 2012 ArtsReach Conference in New York City was led by TRG Arts CEO Rick Lester and his consulting firm colleagues who have helped hundreds of organizations earn millions from demand and pricing strategies TRG pioneered. The intensive was designed for marketing, development and ticketing colleagues to attend together and with other teams. Learn how your role in the process of pricing and demand management can make a positive difference in the way loyal patrons are found, cultivated, and developed over time. Identify the set of facts that tell your organization what’s in demand, and what’s not. Challenge your assumptions about price increases, discount policy, comp distribution, and dynamic pricing. Take home ideas that will build revenues and grow loyal patrons.

Posted March 18, 2012







Mar16

Building Stronger Patron Relationships

Arts Reach 2012

Luminaries at top companies discuss the keys to keeping and upgrading patrons. Jill Robinson, President of TRG Arts, moderated this panel discussion at the Spring 2012 ArtsReach Conference in New York City. 

Posted March 16, 2012







Mar12

In 2012, TRG bloggers are taking a fresh look at data and trends that inform risks worth taking, best practices worth hanging onto, and assumptions worth challenging – each in time for action to be taken.
The operative word in the title question is: think, as in assume.  The more TRG studies patron behavior, the more we realize how often and how much even the smartest managers make wrong assumptions about the patrons who are visiting their exhibits or sitting in the seats of their theatres, concert halls and arenas.

Take the question: Who in attendance at an arts event has been here before?  A 2011 TRG patron origination study told us: only about half. We say “only” because the prevailing conventional wisdom was that most patrons75% or moreare repeat ticket buyers, subscribers, or members.   In fact there are so many new patrons in America’s audiences that the study’s author, TRG Vice President Will Lester dubbed it, Every Night is Opening Night.  

Posted March 12, 2012







Feb13

In 2012, TRG bloggers are taking a fresh look at data and trends that inform risks worth taking, best practices worth hanging onto, and assumptions worth challenging – each in time for action to be taken.
Competition for patron’s dollars is a subject that’s back in the industry dialog again, sometimes with negative overtones. Can we really still think that sharing a marketplace with other successful arts and entertainment organizations is a bad thing? Even with foundations willing to invest in collaborations? I find that disturbing, especially in view of the opportunities being mined daily by members of community collaborations nationwide.

Posted February 13, 2012







Oct20

Photo by Sarah Cartwright via Flickr
It’s conference season and TRG’s expert consultants are hitting the road with our firm’s latest business intelligence on arts consumer behavior and resulting client experience.

American Museum Membership Conference (October 24-27 in Philadelphia)
The American Museum Membership Conference is the annual conference for membership-based fundraising. TRG President Jill Robinson and Katie Maltais, Manager of Accounts and Services, hope to contribute to the dialog on demand management and industry best practices.

Posted October 20, 2011







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